Caine Prize for African Writing

Olufemi Terry

The 2010 Caine Prize Winner, Olufemi Terry

The Caine Prize for African Writing is named in memory of the late Sir Michael Caine, former Chairman of Booker plc. Shortly before he died, Sir Michael Caine was working on the idea of a prize to encourage the growing recognition of the worth of African writing in English, its richness and diversity, by bringing it to a wider audience. His friends and colleagues decided to carry this idea forward and establish a prize of £10,000 to be awarded annually in his memory.

As he intended, the Caine Prize is open to writers from anywhere in Africa for work published in English. Its focus is on the short story, as reflecting the contemporary development of the African story-telling tradition. The Prize was first awarded in 2000 at the Zimbabwe International Book Fair to Leila Abouela for her story “The Museum.”

In 2007, Lannan Center, the GU English Department and Caine Prize committee partnered to establish a month-long residency at Georgetown University for the Caine Prize winner. During their residency, the Caine Prize winner holds office hours, visits classes, and gives readings to the public.

You can learn more about the Caine Prize at caineprize.com.